Teds Masters | Adam Dyson

Ted's Masters: They’re explorers, artists and visionaries, but most importantly they’re your inspiration.


We’ve hand-picked some of Australia’s most amazing photographers to show you how they shoot, the gear they use and what drives them to capture the amazing images they’re known for.

This week we are excited to announce the latest addition to the Ted's Masters team, Adam Dyson!
Adam is a talented Landscape based in Melbourne, and this is his story...

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About Adam


Go on – *drum roll* - Introduce yourself!
Hi, my name is Adam Dyson and I am a professional landscape photographer and content creator based in Melbourne. I love nothing more than escaping the city and finding amazing landscapes.

What defines your photography style?
My style revolves around strong foreground elements, bold colours and glassy water to create surreal yet realistic images. I guess I want to create something different, a photo where people look at something they have seen a hundred times and think, “wow I haven’t seen it like that before”.

 How did you become interested in photography? 

I first started photography when I was 15 years old in high school. I took photojournalism as a subject and instantly fell in love with it. From there I started planning small shoots on weekends and after school, using my friends and family as my models. It wasn’t until after I finished school that I discovered fashion photography, I knew straight away that this was what I wanted to pursue as my career.
 
Do you have any formal training?
No, I am completely self-taught. I was accepted into university but decided that it wasn’t for me.
 
What inspires you? 
Anything and everything! I love looking at books or magazines for inspiration, as well as the world around me. Locations, colours, clothing, movies, models and so much more spark ideas for my shoots. I also love looking online on websites such as Pinterest for inspiration and to keep up to date with trends.
 
What do you think were some of the key elements to the development of your photography? 
Time and hard work were definitely the key elements to developing my photography. I spent (and still do spend) a lot of time practising new techniques, researching ideas and finding ways to improve my work. I am dedicated to bettering my images and working hard to make each shoot better than the last. This has definitely helped me in developing the style and techniques that I use today.

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What type of lighting do you use most within your photography?
I love natural light or a simple studio set up. When I’m in the studio, I often shoot with a single light with a softbox or beauty dish attached. For years I only had access to natural light, so I always love revisiting natural light as well.
 
What are you currently working on? 
I recently shot an editorial with an amazing young actress that I’m about to release. I also have some really exciting upcoming shoots that I’m looking forward to sharing, but I don’t like to give too much away.
 
Who are your favourite photographers and/or artists as of right now? 
I admire so many photographers, it's hard for me to just name a few. Some of my favourites are definitely Patrick Demarchelier, Steven Meisel, Arthur Elgort and Mario Testino. I also really admire Alexi Lubomirski and Lara Jade, who I would consider the new masters of fashion photography.
 
What is your proudest moment as a photographer? 
I have had some of my images displayed in Times Square as part of a photography exhibition, which was an amazing experience. Recently I also had one of my images published on the cover of Sunday Life magazine, which was a proud moment for me.
 
How has social media helped with the success of your photography? 
Social media has been amazing. Instagram, in particular, has really changed the way I market and publish my work. I have gained so many great opportunities and met so many talented people (including models, makeup artists, photographers etc.) through social media, it's amazing being able to connect with someone instantly.
 
 

 

How important is post-processing to your works?
Post processing is super important to my photography. I’ve always believed that the camera can never take as good of a photo as your eyes can see,  and with post-production, I can create that. Post-production and re-touching can be a very controversial subject but in the end it’s the final touches to an awesome photo that make it stand out.


What’s on your gear list?

Fujifilm xt3

Fujifilm xt2

Fujifilm 10-24mm f4

Fujifilm 50-140mm 2.8

Samyang 12mm f2

Nisi Professional 100mm filter kit

Gitzo series 1 mountaineer tripod & Really Right Stuff BH40 head

 
What’s your favourite photo that you’ve ever taken?

Oh gees, I have so many favourites. One that comes to mind is a photo shot at Tenby Point near Phillip Island in Victoria, a place I’ve visited countless times but never the full composition I was after. On this particular day, I arrived super early before sunset giving me plenty of time to look around. After standing nearly knee deep in mud I set my tripod up and spent a good 5 minutes really refining the composition focusing on a tree. It was over an hour until sunset so I packed up and looked around for something else to shoot in the meantime. The hour passed and when I returned to shoot the tree in “better” light the entire foreground was submerged with the rising tide. In all my visits the tide never lined up with sunset the way I would like it too, but on the day it did! It’s still well and truly one of my favourites.

What is the best advice you have ever received?
Good friend and fellow photography/cinematographer Steve Diffey has always said: “you have to get in line and stay in line”. When working in photography it gets hard and you just need keep going, work hard and think that eventually, you will end up at the front of that line.
 

What tips would you give a photographer on best way to get your work published/ or/ to get noticed?
You need to be persistent, it’s that whole idea of if it doesn’t work at first just keep trying. I think social media is a photographers best friend. There’s no better way of getting your work out there for millions of people to see. It honest only take one photo to change everything.  

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Adam Dyson
Adam Dyson
Adam Dyson
Adam Dyson
Adam Dyson

 

Any big plans for the future?
The future is looking amazing. I’m planning on expanding my current photography workshop/tours to include Tasmania, New Zealand, Bali and South America. I am continuing to try to create a different photography experience for everyone who wants to come along. I am also about to launch a small business to focus on low to medium budget social media content creation as well as social media marketing and management. And as always getting out exploring and finding amazing photos.
 
Any advice for the novice photographer?
The biggest tip I can give to anyone starting in photography is the advice my friend gave me, “get in line and stay in line”. I always say to people you need to get out and take photos and refine your skills, post on social media, get feedback and just keep at it. If photography is something you want to do for work just know what it’s not always easy but on the other side of the hard times is something amazing. Photography is an amazing career and I honestly can’t see myself doing anything else.


What's In Adam's Bag


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If you'd like to see more of Adam's work, check out his galleries and website in the links below!